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coolrivername

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #1 
One example of my question:

Suppose I'm packing real light. It's a day-trip. Just a York Box in the
boat, well below the grommet strips. Nothing else in the boat but me on the seat with a paddle.
So, I can strap it to the grommets and it is indeed truly attached to the boat until I un-strap it, but in a flip it would be flopping around. Because it is below the grommet strips.

Another Yorkie example:
I have a big load, lots of bags, boxes, beer kegs, toilet paper, home theater in a box, mooses and antelopes. York box is on the floor of the boat, but it depends on having something on top of it, cinched down tight, to the grommets, to keep it secure and not moving around. It works, but I'd like something better.

Another example:
I put 4-gallon water jugs bow and stern, shoved up against the decks. The jugs just have the handle, through which I can put straps. Again, attached to the grommets, but not snug, with downward tension.

I'm contemplating putting D-Rings far below the grommet strip. Perhaps down low on the tube, but maybe even down on the floor. Several pairs, for Yorkies, water jugs, maybe a gamma bucket, a handwash station, any number of things.

I just am thinking I'd like tiedowns down low in the boat to cinch smaller objects without requiring that something be on top of them to hold them down. Tiedowns so that I can cinch things downward, not upwards towards the grommet strips.

Thoughts and comments?


Canoeman

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Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #2 
I carry a huge load on multi-day expeditions. My load is secured by using 3/4-inch webbing cam straps (custom made by Strapworks) of various lengths to accommodate whatever I am strapping into my boat. I ran the Main Salmon in 2012, and flipped the boat at Big Mallard and again at Vinegar Creek - NOTHING came out of the boat except me.

In my opinion you do not need D-rings to secure a load. You can see photos and read trip reports on Southwest Paddler (http://southwestpaddler.com/) to see how I load my boat and secure the load. Just tightly rig the load and everything should remain securely attached, even when the boat is upside down.

In the first photo below my boat is the S16 on the right.

Main Salmon 030-800.jpg 

In the second photo below I am running Bailey Rapid (Class III).

Main Salmon 117-800.jpg 
The grommets on the gunwales provide excellent lashing points to secure a load, but you should definitely made sure the load is tightly lashed. A loosely lashed load may as well not be lashed at all unless you have thru-points on  your load so that items cannot float free of the boat.

Marc "Canoeman" McCord
http://canoeman.com/
http://southwestpaddler.com/

"Love many, trust few, and ALWAYS paddle your own canoe!"



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"Love many, trust few and ALWAYS paddle your own canoe!"
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